Stage 6: For Fabio, Lance Armstrong, 1995

Etape by Richard Moore - For Fabio - Lance Armstrong Tour de France stage1995

The memory is as vivid as the stain that could be seen darkening the road. It was a damp patch, a small puddle emanating from a stricken rider’s head, expanding on the asphalt as riders sprinted past, rubbernecking at 45 mph to catch a glimpse of the figure on the road. He was lying on his side, curled up in the fetal position.

The Armstrong Era

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The gift: Lance Armstrong and Marco Pantani climbing to the summit of Mont Ventoux in 2000.

Warning Shot

Inside the Box CrossFit ebook

How will the Lance Armstrong situation affect the sport of triathlon?

American Pro: The Red Army Marches On

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Race tactics, low salaries, sponsorship pressure, and a chance to race at Worlds. The highs and lows of a small bike racing team play out in this chapter from American Pro.

American Pro: Dreaming Big

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Some teams have humble beginnings. In this first chapter of Jamie Smith’s book on domestic bike racing, find out how one small team got its start.

Red Kite Prayer Offers This 2-Part Interview of Author Mark Johnson

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Argyle Armada author Mark Johnson has spent the last two years researching and writing a comprehensive look at doping, called “Spitting in the Soup,” published by VeloPress. Red Kite Prayer has been hearing about this book for a good year and has eagerly awaited its release.

What Are the Best Tour de France Stages?

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France book cover

Cycling journalist Richard Moore asks, “What are the most memorable Tour de France stages of all time?”, and poses the 20 stages he thinks earn the mark. Includes excerpts from all 20 stages.

Moral Drift and the American Way, a Chapter from Spitting in the Soup

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The amateur ethos that still informs the Olympic sports runs counter to the very nature of sport, which demands high performance. The increasing commercialization of sports intensifies this tension—and the insidious temptation of corruption. The spirit of sport is a recent WADA invention, not an inherent quality of sport—but it’s still worth the aspiration.