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A Good Machine, an Excerpt from Land of Second Chances

Please enjoy this excerpt from Land of Second Chances: The Impossible Rise of Rwanda’s Cycling Team by Tim Lewis.

“Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer is an excellent portrait of LeMond and the era in which he raced,” says Podium Cafe

Greg LeMond Podium Cafe book review GLM

The excellent critic Feargal McKay has reviewed Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer for Podium Cafe.

Sean Kelly: A Chapter from Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer

Greg LeMond Yellow Jersey Racer Sean Kelly 1983 GLM

When Sean Kelly turned professional in 1977, cycling was a very different sport from the one we know today. With its impenetrable language and customs, it required an apprenticeship that, even for a French national, was tough.

A Gallery of Photographs from Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer

Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer by Guy Andrews GLM

A gallery of photographs from Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer.

American Flyers: A Chapter From Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer

Greg LeMond: Yellow Jersey Racer by Guy Andrews GLM

In the chapter American Flyers, Greg LeMond's rival Jeff Bradley shares what it was like to race against the young LeMond.

What Are the Best Tour de France Stages?

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France book cover

Cycling journalist Richard Moore asks, "What are the most memorable Tour de France stages of all time?", and poses the 20 stages he thinks earn the mark. Includes excerpts from all 20 stages.

How to Reenact the 1986 Tour de France

Slaying the Badger STB 72dpi_400x600p

Here's how you can replay excerpts from Slaying the Badger to enjoy coverage of the entire 1986 Tour de France.

Prologue: The Entire First Chapter of Slaying the Badger

Slaying the Badger STB 72dpi_400x600p

Enjoy the entire first chapter from Richard Moore's book Slaying the Badger.

Slaying the Badger Documentary Film

Slaying the Badger Film Poster STB

VeloPress is not affiliated with the ESPN documentary film that is based on Richard Moore's book Slaying the Badger, but here's what we know about it.

Stage 20, La Resurrection: Greg LeMond in the 1989 Tour de France

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 1989 Greg LeMond La Resurrection

Greg LeMond awoke in Paris on Sunday, July 23, the final day of the 1989 Tour de France, and wondered what the next 12 hours held in store. The previous evening he had told his soigneur, Otto Jacome, that he thought he could do

Stage 19, Redemption: David Millar in the 2012 Tour de France

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 2012 David Millar Redemption

We had two and a half weeks to go,” says David Millar, reflecting on the situation he and his team, Garmin- Sharp, found themselves in, just one week into the 2012 Tour. “So we had to pull our heads out of our arses and find a new way of racing.”

Stage 18, Playstation Cycling: Andy Schleck in the 2011 Tour de France

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 2011 Andy Schleck playstation cycling

It was a stage destined for the history books. But that was the whole point. On the 100th anniversary of the Tour’s first expedition into the Alps, the 18th stage finished at the top of one of the most mythical of mountains, the Col du Galibier.

Stage 17, Untold Stories: Mark Cavendish, Bernhard Eisel, and David Millar in the 2010 Tour de France

Etape by Richard Moore Tour de France stages 2010 Mark Cavendish, Bernhard Eisel, David Millar, Untold Stories

Climbing the Col du Tourmalet, Mark Cavendish slips out the back of the group. His loyal teammate, Bernhard Eisel, remains at his side and tries to encourage him. “Big effort, Cav, come on, stay with the group."

Stage 16 Honor Among Thieves: Lance Armstrong and Iban Mayo in the 2003 Tour de France

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 2003 Lance Armstrong, Iban Mayo Honor Among Thieves

Lance Armstrong is angry. “I mean, listen, look. Travis Tygart and his band of haters can say what they want. Those Tours happened. . . . It was an unfortunate time, most of us if not all of us played by the same set of rules. . . . I consider myself the winner of those seven Tours.”

Stage 15 Champagne Freddy: Freddy Maertens in the 1981 Tour de France

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France:

“Anyone who says they can do it naturally is a liar,” says Maertens, meaning racing without drugs.

Stage 14 The Unknown Warrior: Jose Luis Viejo in the 1976 Tour de France

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France: The Unknown Warrior Jose Luis Viejo 1976

The biggest winning margin by an individual rider on a stage of the Tour de France? That would be José Luis Viejo, on stage 11 in 1976.

Stage 13 Shock and Awe: Bobby Julich, Jorg Jaksche, Marco Pantani, and Jan Ullrich at the 1998 Tour de France

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France: Jan Ullrich, Marco Pantani, Bobby Julich 1998 Shock and Awe

“Every day, including the stage to Plateau de Beille, he was just sitting at the back with his team,” recalls Bobby Julich, the American who was fourth in the Dublin prologue. “This is before race radios, and when you’re going back to talk to the team car there’s Marco sitting at the back, in last position.

Stage 12: The Devil, Claudio Chiappucci, 1992

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France: Claudio Chiappucci The Devil 1992

Ten minutes later, the electronic gate clicks and whirs and begins to slide open. Instantly recognizable, the cyclist once known as “El Diablo” (the devil) appears behind the wheel of an SUV with a 20-something girl in the passenger seat. He is 50 but looks and dresses about 30 years younger.

Stage 11 Anarchy: Stephen Roche, Jean-Francois Bernard, and Andy Hampsten in the 1987 Tour de France

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France: Shelly Verses, Jean-Francois Bernard, Andy Hampsten, Stephen Roche 1987 Anarchy

There’s a photo of me washing his face at the finish,” says Shelley Verses, “but really I was trying to cover his face, to hide it.”

Stage 10: Guerrilla Warfare, Luis Herrera, Bernard Hinault, and Laurent Fignon, 1984

Richard Moore Etape: 20 Great Stages from the Modern Tour de France: Luis Herrera, Bernard Hinault, Laurent Fignon 1984 Guerrilla Warfare

Herrara, the little bird, is set free. Now he is flying up l’Alpe d’Huez, while Hinault labors, and a little lower down the mountain, Laurent Fignon, in the tricolore of French champion, sets off in pursuit.

Stage 9: What About Zimmy? Urs Zimmermann, 1991

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages urs zimmerman what about zimmy 1991

It wasn't that Urs Zimmermann didn’t like his fellow cyclists. It was just that, after two weeks in their company, he felt like he needed a change.

Stage 8: Trilogy, Eddy Merckx, 1971

The trouble with Merckx is that there are so many deeds to choose from. The pick for many is 1969 and his Tour de France début, specifically the stage that tackled the “Circle of Death” in the Pyrenees—Col de Peyresourde, Col d’Aspin, Col du Tourmalet, and Col d’Aubisque. Merckx attacked over the top of the Tourmalet, then rode alone for 140 km—about 87 miles—to win in Mourenx. That performance prompted the Tour director, Jacques Goddet, to coin a new word, Merckxissimo.

Stage 7: Dutch Cold War, Marc Sargeant and Frans Maassen, 1992

The trio was over 15 minutes clear of the peloton; now there were only 35 km remaining, just 22 miles, and it was certain that one of them was going to win. Then one of the three, having spoken to his team car, stopped working. He moved to the back. When he moved forward to do his turn on the front, he soft-pedaled. The speed dropped dramatically.

Stage 6: For Fabio, Lance Armstrong, 1995

Etape by Richard Moore - For Fabio - Lance Armstrong Tour de France stage1995

The memory is as vivid as the stain that could be seen darkening the road. It was a damp patch, a small puddle emanating from a stricken rider’s head, expanding on the asphalt as riders sprinted past, rubbernecking at 45 mph to catch a glimpse of the figure on the road. He was lying on his side, curled up in the fetal position.

Stage 5: Beware of the Badger, Bernard Hinault, 1980

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages the Badger 1980 Bernard Hinault

“It’s bollocks, this race. You’re working like an animal, you don’t have time to piss, you wet your pants; you’re riding in mud like this, you’re slipping. It’s a piece of shit. . . .”

Stage 4: The Boy with Fire in His Eyes, Mark Cavendish, 2009

Etape by Richard Moore Tour de France stages Mark Cavendish 2009 BOURGOIN JALLIEU AUBENAS

I ask Mark Cavendish to discuss his best-ever stage win in the Tour de France and he is transformed. He sits upright. First, he must decide which one was best.

Stage 3: The Sculptor, Joel Pelier, 1989

Etape by Richard Moore Tour de France stage 1989 The Sculptor Joel Pelier

In the morning of the first road stage of the 1989 Tour de France, Joël Pelier told his team director, Javier Mínguez, “I would like to attack today.”

Stage 2: The Bulldog, Wilfried Nelissen, 1994

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 1994 The Bulldog Wilfried Nelissen

They are sprinting for the line in Armentières at 70 kph (43 mph): a heaving, jostling bunch, a slightly downhill finish, a right- hand bend with 400 m to go, another right-hander with 150 to go; then the road kicks slightly up. All heads go down.

Stage 1: The Outsider, Chris Boardman, 1994

Etape by Richard Moore tour de france stages 1994 Chris Boardman

"At the 1994 Tour, everybody went for a three-week race,” says Chris Boardman. “I went for seven minutes.”

Richard Moore’s Book Slaying the Badger Premieres at Tribeca Film Festival

featured STB Tribeca

Cycling enthusiasts are invited to a talk and booksigning with award-winning sports journalist Richard Moore at Rapha Cycle Club New York City before the worldwide film premiere of Slaying the Badger, Moore’s retelling of the 1986 Tour de France rivalry between American Greg LeMond and Frenchman Bernard Hinault.

Eddy Merckx and The Last Race of the Cannibal

Eddy Merckx in tears from the book Merckx 525

The photo on page 215 of Merckx 525 is among the most telling in this amazing tome. The setting is the 1977 Tour de France, a race the great Eddy Merckx did not win. Not even close.

Eddy Merckx, Doping, and the Savona Bomb

Eddy Merckx nears the end of his bike racing career Merckx 525

“I went completely to pieces,” declares Merckx.

Eddy Merckx, Out of the Saddle

Eddy Merckx and his wife Claudine at the airport from the book Merckx 525

Some of Merckx 525's best material are the lifestyle shots both before and after Merckx found fame.

Eddy Merckx Takes on the World Hour Record

M525 Merckx world hour record 1972 Mexico

Merckx reflected on his sixty-minute ride. “Never before had I had such pain,” he said. “And I have never felt such pain again.”

The Conquests of Eddy Merckx

Eddy Merckx and Jacques Anquetil from the book Merckx 525

“Cannibal” is not a nickname that conjures images of grace and respect. Yet when the young Eddy Merckx began to discover his greatness, he did so with dignity.

Young Eddy Merckx and His Early Race Wins

preview of page from Merckx 525 book

Except in the earliest years of his career, Merckx knew he would be the winner more often than not.

How the Tour de France Has Changed

Discovery News Tour de France 100 Richard Moore

Before the Tour de France this summer, Discovery News posted an interesting story featuring Tour de France 100: How the Tour de France Has Changed.

Richard Moore’s PodiumCafe Interview on le Tour de France: Past and Present

Richard Moore Tour de France 100 PodiumCafe

Award-winning author Richard Moore was just interviewed about le Tour, present and past.

Tour de France Cycling Jerseys of the Golden Era

TDF100, Tour de France 100, History of the Tour de France

An aerial view of the peloton as it passes through Brest during the 1974 Tour de France. Among the teams represented are Peugeot, Kas, Molteni, and Brooklyn, sporting some of the iconic jerseys and small peaked caps from what many agree was a golden era for the sport.

Summit Sprint: Cadel Evans, Bradley Wiggins, and Vincenzo Nibali in the 2012 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Defending champion Cadel Evans leads Bradley Wiggins and Vincenzo Nibali, who would eventually finish third, at the end of stage 7, to La Planche des Belles Filles, the first summit finish of the 2012 Tour.

Who Leads Whom? Chris Froome Leads Bradley Wiggins During the 2012 Tour de France

TDF100, Tour de France 100, History of the Tour de France

Chris Froome Leads Bradley Wiggins During the 2012 Tour de France

On the Brink: Cadel Evans on Alpe d’Huez at the 2011 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Cadel Evans is comforted by fans after stage 19 of the 2011 race, which finished atop Alpe d'Huez. He had done enough to remain in contention; the next day, he would claim yellow to become Australia's first-ever winner.

The Most Famous Time Trial in History

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The great comeback: Perhaps the most famous time trial in Tour history.

Alpine Beauty: The Col du Galibier

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The riders of the 1987 Tour scale the majestic Col du Galibier, which, at 2,645 meters (8,678 feet), is often the highest point of the race. Close to the top is a monument to Henri Desgrange, the Tour's founder, and ever year that the race visits the Galibier the "Souvenir Henri Desgrange" is awarded to the first rider to reach the summit.

The Armstrong Era

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The gift: Lance Armstrong and Marco Pantani climbing to the summit of Mont Ventoux in 2000.

Moonscape: Louison Bobet on the Bald Mountain, Mont Ventoux, at the 1955 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Louison Bobet on the Bald Mountain, Mont Ventoux, at the 1955 Tour de France

Armstrong’s Downfall

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Perhaps the single most dramatic moment of the Lance Armstrong era.

Podium Cafe on Tour de France 100: “Like a 60-inch plasma screen” of Tour photographs

TDF100, Tour de France 100, History of the Tour de France

Podium Cafe on Tour de France 100: "Like a 60-inch plasma screen" of Tour photographs

Old Master, Young Pretender: LeMond and Indurain

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Greg LeMond, in the rainbow jersey of world champion, leads a young Miguel Indurain on their breakaway to Luz Ardiden on stage 16 of the 1990 Tour.

A Dark Shadow: Marco Pantani at Stage 12 of the 1998 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Marco Pantani at Stage 12 of the 1998 Tour de France

Into Thin Air: Poulidor and Federico Bahamontes lead the 1963 Tour de France.

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Poulidor and Federico Bahamontes lead the bunch through the mountains during the 1963 race.

The Best of France: Bernard Hinault

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Hinault keeps a wary eye on his former protégé, Laurent Fignon, as the two go head-to-head in the 1984 Tour.

“We run on dynamite.” Henri Pelissier, his brother Francis, and Maurice Ville Speak Out on Drugs

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Henri Pelissier, his brother Francis, and Maurice Ville Speak Out on Drugs

Night Stages: Into the Darkness of the 1903 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

They started at 2 a.m., when the Pyrenees were shrouded in darkness: Lapize pushes his bike up the Col de Peyresourde, helped by the headlights of a following car.

The Best Table in the House: The Three 5-Time Winners of the Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The three five-time Tour winners meet at the 1987 race: Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault, and Jacques Anquetil. Anquetil would die just four months later of stomach cancer.

BikeRumor Reviews Tour de France 100: “Stories Well Told”

TDF100, Tour de France 100, History of the Tour de France

“There is such great depth in the writing that you will not simply thumb through the book and be done with it, but will instead be drawn in by the stories being well-told.” — BikeRumor

Tour de France: Coppi vs. Bartali

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Tour winner Fausto Coppi leads his archrival, Gino Bartali, through the high mountains of the 1949 Tour de France.

Active.com on Tour de France 100: “The photography is stunning and leaves no stone unturned.”

TDF100, Tour de France 100, History of the Tour de France

“If you're looking for one on the greatest race of them all, you need look no further than The Tour de France 100. The photography is stunning and leaves no stone unturned.” — Active.com

Cobbled Crossing: Jacques Goddet at the 1937 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The Tour crossing Vannes, in the cycling heartland of Brittany, toward the end of the 1937 race. It was Jacques Goddet's first Tour as director.

Red Kite Prayer Reviews Tour de France 100: “The Perfect Narration”

Red Kite Prayer Tour de France 100

“Were this a slide show, Moore’s text would make for the perfect narration, reminding us of the storylines that dominated each year’s race. He not only covers the racing action, he brings in the present…” — Red Kite Prayer

A Rare Color Photograph from the 1959 Tour de France: Bahamontes, Gaul, Riviere

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

A rare color image from the 1959 Tour showing three of the best riders of the era: Bahamontes, Gaul, and Riviere.

The Snaking Peloton: 1951 Tour de France from Bert Hardy

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Before Graham Watson, there was British photographer Bert Hardy.

A Giant of the Road: Francois Faber in the 1909 Tour de France

Tour de France 100 : A Photographic History of the Tour de France

Francois Faber in the 1909 Tour de France

The First Tour: L’Auto Front Page on the Morning of the First Ever Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

L'Auto created the Tour de France. Here's the front page on the morning of the first ever Tour.

Domestique Duty: Collecting Bidons from the Team Car

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Normally he would collect bidons (water bottles) from the team car, but in these days they would take what they could, often raiding bars or shops to collect cold drinks.

Blood Sport: A Crash in the Peloton at the 1962 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Joseph Thomin battles to rejoin the peloton after a nasty crash in 1962.

The Angel of the Mountains: Charly Gaul at the Col de la Cayolle, 1955 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Gaul won two mountain stages, finished third overall, and claimed the King of the Mountains.

The Service Course, 1951 Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Team cars, packed with spare wheels, at a stage start during the 1951 Tour.

Not Roads, but Alpine Tracks: The 1920 Tour de France “Road” Was Unpaved

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

A stark illustrations of the poor quality of the Tour de France road surfaces at the time.

The First Double Winner of the Tour de France: Maurice Garin

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

The first double winner after Maurice Garin was stripped of his second Tour.

The Circle of Death: “Murderers!”, yelled Octave Lapize

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Octave Lapize at the summit of the Col d'Aubisque in the 1910 Tour de France.

Goddet and the First Tour Superchamp, Jacques Anquetil

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Jacques Goddet with the first five-time Tour de France winner, Jacques Anquetil, in 1963.

Father of the Tour: Henri Desgrange Fears for the Future of the Tour de France

Tour de France 100: A Photographic History of the Tour de France; TDF100

Henri Desgrange had been a racing cyclist before becoming a journalist with L'Auto and the first organizer of the Tour.

Praise for Merckx 525

Merckx 525 book cover image M525_96dpi_500pw_photo

Praise for Merckx 525

This Has Been the 1986 Tour de France

We hope you have enjoyed our coverage of the 1986 Tour de France, which we feel will go down in history as the greatest ever Tour.

Greg LeMond Visits White House

LeMond visits White House Velo-news

Excerpt from 1986 Velo-News about Greg LeMond's win at the 1986 Tour de France

Greg LeMond Wins the Tour de France!

Greg LeMond first American to win the Tour de France 1986 Velo-news

Greg LeMond appears on the cover of Velo-news magazine after winning the 1986 Tour de France!

Where to Find Velo-news Books

Velo-news Book Dealers

Ad from 1986 Velo-news magazine showing readers where to buy Velo-news books

Hinault Is Worth His Weight in Beans

After Bernard Hinault was weighed so he could be given his weight in coffee by cycling trade sponsor Cafe de Colombia, it was on to stage 22, a 194km ceremonial march from Clermont- Ferrand to Nevers.

Enjoy the “Agony of Winning” in The Race for the Yellow Jersey (now on cassette)

The Race for the Yellow Jersey on cassette

1986 ad that ran in Velo-News magazine during the Tour de France

The Badger Is Slain! Hinault Finally Concedes to LeMond

Today's stage 21 was a hilly one that finished atop the Puy de Dôme—the spectacular dome-shaped volcanic plug in the Massif Central. The Puy de Dôme is a climb of rich symbolism and incident, where Hinault had fancied claiming his first yellow jersey in 1978, where Eddy Merckx had been punched in the kidneys three years earlier. This year, the mountain's role is to perhaps allow a challenger to make one last, desperate bid for the yellow jersey.

Who Reads Velo-news?

Velo-news advertisement - readership

An ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news

LeMond’s Disastrous Time Trial Ends in Yellow

Greg LeMond rides the Stage 9 ITT in Nantes during the 1986 Tour de France

Today’s stage 20 looked to be a critical one in the Tour de France, a 58km individual time trial in Saint-Etienne. This stage presented the last time trial of the Tour, one which Hinault said would seal the victory of the strongest rider.

How to Train and Race Bicycle Time Trials

Velo-news ad Solo Cycling by Fred Matheny

An ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news

Is Greg LeMond in Danger?

featured STB Tribeca

Is Greg LeMond in danger at the 1986 Tour de France?

The Two-Wheeled Athlete: Physiology for the Cyclist

Velo-news ad The Two-Wheeled Athlete

An ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news

Hinault and LeMond Ride Together Up Alpe d’Huez!

Greg LeMond and Bernard Hinault ascend Alpe d'Huez 1986 Tour de France

Greg LeMond's first day in the yellow jersey was not an easy one. Stage 18 almost immediately ascended the Col du Lautaret then the Col du Galibier en route to a summit finish on Alpe d'Huez.

Greg LeMond First American to Lead the Tour de France!

Greg LeMond dropped an injured Bernard Hinault on today's mountain stage to become the first rider from the United States to wear the yellow jersey of the leader of the Tour de France.

In Mistral Winds, the Badger Sneaks Away Again

Velo-news photo of the 1986 Tour de France climbers Hampsten, Hinault, LeMond, Herrera

On today's stage 16, the peloton faced strong winds on the roads from Nimes to Gap, winds that forced the riders into echelons.

Tour Abandons: Phinney Crashes Out, Fignon Abandons

Team 7-Eleven's sprinter Davis Phinney has dropped out of the Tour after crashing heavily on today's Stage 15. This leaves the team relying on Phinney's usual lead-out man Ron Kiefel to contest the sprints. Fortunately, Kiefel has shown that he has the legs for the Tour, narrowly missing a stage win to Peeters on stage 7.

Davis Phinney Crashes Out of the Tour on Stage 15

Battered by wind and torrid heat, much of this stage from Carcassonne to Nimes was spent riding in echelons.

How to Order Velo-news Back Issues

How to Order Velo-news Back Issues

Ad ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news magazine

Always Stirring the Pot, La Vie Claire Takes Stage 14

After two dramatic days in the Pyrenees that saw a big shake up in the overall standings, today's stage traveled 154 km across the south of France into the foothills of the Alps.

Cornered, the Badger Defends His Attack

Did Hinault give LeMond permission to attack? “I’m not his father,” replied Hinault. “He can do what he likes. What’s important is to keep the jersey in the team.”

Hampsten and Grewal: Hinault’s Attack Was Suicidal

Alexi Grewal photo from Team 7-Eleven book

Team 7-Eleven's Alexi Grewal, the winner of the 1984 Olympic road race, described Hinault’s solo attack on this second day in the Pyrenees as “undoubtedly the most stupid move of the race so far.

Hinault Cracks after Kamikaze Attack! LeMond Wins Stage!

Andy Hampsten

Greg LeMond won his second Tour de France stage today after his La Vie Claire teammate and race leader Bernard Hinault cracked spectacularly on the climbs leading to the finish in Superbagneres. LeMond's win is the first ever mountain stage win for an American in the Tour de France.

LeMond and Hinault Near Fisticuffs! LeMond: “Hinault’s gonna pay.”

Today's stage 12 to Pau saw Bernard Hinault launch a sneak attack on the overall favorites.

Hinault Takes Yellow with Sneak Attack to Pau!

Hinault leads Delgado on stage 12 of the 1986 Tour de France

During the early miles of Stage 12 from Bayonne to Pau, the peloton rode calmly, saving their legs for the first major climb of the Tour, the first-category Col de Marie-Blanque, until something unexpected happened.

Hammering for Hollywood, Peloton “Races It Up” on Longest Stage

Bernard Hinault and his many yellow jerseys

Thinking that this longest of Tour stages from Poitiers to Bordeaux was to be a hot, lazy, flat slog, many Tour journalists went 130km ahead to take advantage of a sumptuous Bastille Day buffet put out free by the rich brandy burghers of the French region of Cognac.

LeMond Guts It Out for 60km with Food Poisoning!

Bernard Hinault Sportscaster card from 1978

According to riders interviewed after today's Stage 10 from Nantes to Futuroscope, the stench was overpowering: a rotten, putrid smell, so bad that several riders looked around, their faces screwing up as though they were sucking on lemons. The peloton watched Greg LeMond, fourth in line, being led back to the pack by a string of his La Vie Claire teammates.

Hinault: “Fignon is below par.”

Was it his failure to mount disk wheels, the accumulated fatigue from riding 1,000km at the front of the bunch, or simply "un jour sans," as a French report has suggested?

LeMond: “I would have beaten Hinault.”

American hopeful Greg LeMond is disheartened. When asked about the significance of losing 44 seconds to Hinault, LeMond acknowledges that Hinault expected this stage to determine La Vie Claire's team captain.

Hinault Defeats LeMond in Stage 9 Individual Time Trial

Greg LeMond rides the Stage 9 ITT in Nantes during the 1986 Tour de France

Hinault’s attack on the road to Cherbourg only served to make Greg LeMond even more uncertain and edgy. They have barely left the blocks, but already the pledge that Hinault made to help the American seems as believable as Santa Claus.

Massive Field Sprints for First in Nantes

Team 7-Eleven's Bob Roll

Finally a massive field sprint after days of breakaways!

Second-place Kiefel: “Tour Is Unbelievably Hard, 10 kph Faster than U.S. Races”

Team 7-Eleven's Ron Kiefel looks tired at Tirreno-Adriatico

"I should have been in my 12," commented a frustrated Ron Kiefel after finishing second in Stage 7 to multiple classics winner Ludo Peeters.

The Badger Attacks!

The Badger Attacks

Stage 6 to Cherbourg witnessed a surprise attack by a GC favorite. En route to Brittany, Bernard Hinault's stomping grounds, the Badger attacked the peloton.

Two-Man Break Storms Stage 5 in Seaside Resort of Villers-Sur-Mer

After a 100km breakaway in the company of Frenchman Joel Pelier, Dutchman Johan Van der Velde won the sprint at this seaside resort and as a plus took the yellow jersey.

Tension in the Peloton: 40 Riders Crash During Nervous Stage 4

"La Tournée des Accidents" or "The Tour of Crashes" headlined one regional newspaper after this long but flat transitional stage.

VeloPress Reenacts the Greatest Ever Tour de France

Slaying the Badger 1986 Tour de France Velo-news featured

VeloPress has begun telling the inside story of the 1986 Tour de France on the book's website SlayingtheBadger.com.

Système U Hammers La Vie Claire in TTT

Saturday afternoon’s stage is a 56-km team time trial, an event La Vie Claire dominated in 1985, winning by over a minute. But now, in 1986 on the road from Meudon to Saint Quentin, something very, very odd happened.

Disaster at the Tour: Team 7-Eleven Holds Jersey for Just 3 Hours

Team 7-Eleven book: Alex Stieda smiles after winning the yellow jersey of the Tour de France

Just hours after becoming the first North American to win the race lead at the Tour de France, Alex Stieda has lost the yellow jersey after a disastrous team time trial performance by the 7-Eleven Team.

First in Yellow: Alex Stieda Leads the Tour de France after Stage 1!

Team 7-Eleven book Alex Stieda wears Tour de France yellow jersey

The first stage of the Tour de France marked an historic achievement for North American cycling: Alex Steida, Team 7-Eleven's Canadian rider, has become the first North American ever to wear the yellow jersey of the leader of the Tour de France.

Fignon’s Systeme U Takes Prologue!

Frenchman Thierry Marie (Systeme U) won today's opening stage of the Tour de France, a 4 kilometer individual time trial snaking through Boulogne-Billancourt.

Hinault’s Promise to LeMond: I will help you win the Tour

"Next year it's you who will win the Tour, and I'll be there to give you a hand." -- Bernard Hinault to Greg LeMond

The Badger Appoints Two Successors

Bernard Hinault, Bernard Tapie, Greg LeMond

A week out from the start of the 1986 Tour de France, five-time Tour de France winner Bernard Hinault, the Badger, has responded to rumors swirling in the peloton about his upcoming retirement and who -- if anyone -- might fill his spot on the La Vie Claire team.

A Word from Our Sponsors

Coors Golden Spike Bicycle Classic advertisement

Ad ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news magazine

Hampsten and Hinault Favored to Win, Fignon Calls LeMond “An Excellent Second”

Velo-news 1986 tour de france preview of the favorites

Felix Magowan of Velo-news offers this preview of the 1986 Tour de France

Andy Hampsten Wins Tour of Switzerland, Readies for Tour

Velo-news Andy Hampsten wins 1986 Tour of Switzerland

Drawing from his book Team 7-Eleven, Geoff Drake interviews Andy Hampsten on his Giro d'Italia win which was just months before the 1986 Tour de France.

1986 Tour de France Route Map and Schedule

1986 Tour de France route map Velo-news Slaying the Badger

Amaury Sport Organisation, organizer of the Tour de France, has kindly released the stage map and schedule for the upcoming 1986 Tour de France to Velo-news.

Despite Injuries, Team 7-Eleven’s Morale for Tour Is High

Team 7-Eleven Paris-Nice 1986

The injury list is ominous -- broken ribs, broken noses, sinus infections, stress fractures, bronchitis, and dysentery. Not exactly an auspicious start for the first American-based professional team to compete in the Tour de France.

LeMond Battles to 4th in Giro

Greg LeMond Slaying the Badger Velo-news

American Greg LeMond, captain of the La Vie Claire team, placed fourth in the 69th Giro d'Italia, behind winner Robert Visentini, Giuseppe Saronni, and Francesco Moser.

Shimano Congratulates New U.S. Pro Road Champion Thomas Prehn

Thomas Prehn shimano win ad

Ad ad from a 1986 issue of Velo-news magazine

Surprising Prehn Takes Pro Road Title

Thomas Prehn wins pro road race

"This was definitely the biggest win of my career," said Thomas Prehn after outsprinting Jorgen Marcussen of Denmark to win the CoreStates USPRO Championship in Philadelphia on June 15.

Read the First Chapter of Slaying the Badger

The First Chapter of Slaying the Badger

Mark Cavendish Describes the Day He Won the 2011 Road Cycling World Championship

“Dave, I’m going to win the worlds tomorrow.” Dave was Dave Millar and I was already the world champion in my own imagination. It was midafternoon on Saturday, September 24, 2011, and we’d just watched Giorgia Bronzini from Italy win the women’s world championships road race on a TV in our hotel room.

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