What Happened When a 300-Pounder Tried CrossFit

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Photo by Jay Kay (jayknickerbockerphotography.com)

(originally published on Stack.com)

The first time he walked into a CrossFit box about a year ago, 30-year-old Travis Brumbaugh was a chain-smoking sales manager whose weight hovered around 300 pounds. “I was doing all of the wrong things,” he says.

Brumbaugh wore size 44 pants and frequently worked 12-hour days. To counter the stress of his job, he ate pretty much anything and everything, and his weight skyrocketed as a result. After trying and failing numerous diets, he was on pace to become one of the 25.8 million Americans suffering from Type 2 Diabetes. And though he’d recently trimmed down to about 285 pounds thanks to a set of P90X DVDs, he’d fallen off the wagon and his weight was climbing back up when, in a last-ditch effort, he joined CrossFit 428 in Tampa, Fla.

With a body type that could be categorized as morbidly obese, Brumbaugh was not even close to being prepared to handle the intense workouts performed by elite athletes at the CrossFit Games. Trainer Hope Keddington knew she’d have to scale back the movements and workouts to a level Brumbaugh could safely handle. “He was very overweight and he wanted to come in every day,” Keddington says. “I tend to be blunt. I told him, ‘If you can do it, I am all for it. But it’s going to be hard.’”

Keddington, who coached the 5:30 a.m. class, was an Olympic lifter in college, and she had seen many newcomers set unrealistic goals, grow frustrated and give up. She convinced Brumbaugh to try a three-days-per-week approach, which would give him sufficient time to recover from each workout. The workouts were challenging, and Brumbaugh started off slowly, but he kept coming back consistently. He liked Keddington’s coaching and the team atmosphere of the gym and its members. Eventually he saw results.

“It felt like an overnight thing,” Brumbaugh says. “In the fourth month, it was like the fat just started falling off me.”

After 10 months, Brumbaugh had lost over 60 pounds and burned 10 inches off his waist size, from 44 to 34. Attending the 5 a.m. classes, he upped his attendance to four, and eventually to five days per week. Today, “he only misses workouts on the rarest of occasions,” Keddington says. “He’s the poster child for what CrossFit can do for you.”

Last November, Brumbaugh competed in the entry level section of an inter-gym competition. He hit a personal record on the Snatch, lifting 135 pounds, as well as a PR for Pull-Ups. “He did 10 of them,” Keddington says proudly. “All unbroken.”

(Read the rest of the story on Stack.com)

In Inside the Box, veteran journalist and marathoner T.J. Murphy goes all in to expose the gritty, high-intensity sport of CrossFit®. From staggering newcomer to evangelist, Murphy finds out how it feels, why it’s so popular, and whether CrossFit can fix his broken body.

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